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Essays Or Counsels Civil And Moral By Francis Bacon

Essayes: Religious Meditations. Places of Perswasion and Disswasion. Seene and Allowed (1597) was the first published book by the philosopher, statesman and juristFrancis Bacon. The Essays are written in a wide range of styles, from the plain and unadorned to the epigrammatic. They cover topics drawn from both public and private life, and in each case the essays cover their topics systematically from a number of different angles, weighing one argument against another. A much-enlarged second edition appeared in 1612 with 38 essays. Another, under the title Essayes or Counsels, Civill and Morall, was published in 1625 with 58 essays. Translations into French and Italian appeared during Bacon's lifetime.[1][2]

Critical reception[edit]

Though Bacon considered the Essays "but as recreation of my other studies", he was given high praise by his contemporaries, even to the point of crediting him with having invented the essay form.[3][4] Later researches made clear the extent of Bacon's borrowings from the works of Montaigne, Aristotle and other writers, but the Essays have nevertheless remained in the highest repute.[5][6] The 19th century literary historian Henry Hallam wrote that "They are deeper and more discriminating than any earlier, or almost any later, work in the English language".[7]

Aphorisms[edit]

Bacon's genius as a phrase-maker appears to great advantage in the later essays. In Of Boldness he wrote, "If the Hill will not come to Mahomet, Mahomet will go to the hill", which is the earliest known appearance of that proverb in print.[8] The phrase "hostages to fortune" appears in the essay Of Marriage and Single Life – again the earliest known usage.[9]Aldous Huxley's book Jesting Pilate took its epigraph, "What is Truth? said jesting Pilate; and would not stay for an answer", from Bacon's essay Of Truth.[10] The 1999 edition of The Oxford Dictionary of Quotations includes no fewer than 91 quotations from the Essays.[11]

Contents listing[edit]

The contents pages of Thomas Markby's 1853 edition list the essays and their dates of publication as follows:[12]

  • Of Truth (1625)
  • Of Death (1612, enlarged 1625)
  • Of Unity in Religion/Of Religion (1612, rewritten 1625)
  • Of Revenge(1625)
  • Of Adversity (1625)
  • Of Simulation and Dissimulation (1625)
  • Of Parents and Children (1612, enlarged 1625)
  • Of Marriage and Single Life (1612, slightly enlarged 1625)
  • Of Envy (1625)
  • Of Love (1612, rewritten 1625)
  • Of Great Place (1612, slightly enlarged 1625)
  • Of Boldness (1625)
  • Of Goodness and Goodness of Nature (1612, enlarged 1625)
  • Of Nobility (1612, rewritten 1625)
  • Of Seditions and Troubles (1625)
  • Of Atheism (1612, slightly enlarged 1625)
  • Of Superstition (1612, slightly enlarged 1625)
  • Of Travel (1625)
  • Of Empire (1612, much enlarged 1625)
  • Of Counsels (1612, enlarged 1625)
  • Of Delays (1625)
  • Of Cunning (1612, rewritten 1625)
  • Of Wisdom for a Man's Self (1612, enlarged 1625)
  • Of Innovations (1625)
  • Of Dispatch (1612)
  • Of Seeming Wise (1612)
  • Of Friendship (1612, rewritten 1625)
  • Of Expense (1597, enlarged 1612, again 1625)
  • Of the True Greatness of Kingdoms and Estates (1612, enlarged 1625)
  • Of Regiment of Health (1597, enlarged 1612, again 1625)
  • Of Suspicion (1625)
  • Of Discourse (1597, slightly enlarged 1612, again 1625)
  • Of Plantations (1625)
  • Of Riches (1612, much enlarged 1625)
  • Of Prophecies (1625)
  • Of Ambition (1612, enlarged 1625)
  • Of Masques and Triumphs (1625)
  • Of Nature in Men (1612, enlarged 1625)
  • Of Custom and Education (1612, enlarged 1625)
  • Of Fortune (1612, slightly enlarged 1625)
  • Of Usury (1625)
  • Of Youth and Age (1612, slightly enlarged 1625)
  • Of Beauty (1612, slightly enlarged 1625)
  • Of Deformity (1612, somewhat altered 1625)
  • Of Building (1625)
  • Of Gardens (1625)
  • Of Negotiating (1597, enlarged 1612, very slightly altered 1625)
  • Of Followers and Friends (1597, slightly enlarged 1625)
  • Of Suitors (1597, enlarged 1625)
  • Of Studies (1597, enlarged 1625)
  • Of Faction (1597, much enlarged 1625)
  • Of Ceremonies and Respects (1597, enlarged 1625)
  • Of Praise (1612, enlarged 1625)
  • Of Vain Glory (1612)
  • Of Honour and Reputation (1597, omitted 1612, republished 1625)
  • Of Judicature (1612)
  • Of Anger (1625)
  • Of Vicissitude of Things (1625)
  • A Fragment of an Essay of Fame
  • Of the Colours of Good and Evil

Recent editions[edit]

  • Michael J. Hawkins (ed.) Essays (London: J. M. Dent, 1973). No. 1010 in Everyman's Library.
  • Michael Kiernan (ed.) The Essayes or Counsels, Civill and Morall (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1985). Vol. 15 of The Oxford Francis Bacon.
  • John Pitcher (ed.) The Essays (Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1985). In the Penguin Classics series.
  • Brian Vickers (ed.) The Essays or Counsels, Civil and Moral (New York: Oxford University Press). In the Oxford World's Classics series.

See also[edit]

[edit]

External links[edit]

  1. ^Burch, Dinah (ed). "The Essays". The Oxford Companion to English Literature. Oxford Reference Online (Subscription service). Retrieved 12 May 2012. 
  2. ^"Catalogue entry". Copac. Retrieved 12 May 2012. 
  3. ^Heard, Franklin Fiske. "Bacon's Essays, with annotations by Richard Whately and notes and a glossarial index". Making of America Books. Retrieved 13 May 2012. 
  4. ^Bacon, Francis (2000) [1985]. Kiernan, Michael, ed. The Essayes or Counsels, Civill and Morall. New York: Oxford University Press. p. xlix. ISBN 0198186738. Retrieved 13 May 2012. 
  5. ^Matthew, H. C. G.; Harrison, Brian, eds. (2004). The Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, vol. 3. Oxford University Press. p. 142. 
  6. ^Ward, A. W.; Waller, A. R., eds. (1907–27). The Cambridge History of English and American Literature. Cambridge University Press. pp. 395–98. 
  7. ^Hallam, Henry (1854). Introduction to the Literature of Europe in the Fifteenth, Sixteenth, and Seventeenth Centuries, Vol 2. Boston: Little, Brown. p. 514. 
  8. ^Simpson, John (1993). The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Proverbs. Oxford University Press. p. 176. 
  9. ^The Oxford English Dictionary Vol 7. Oxford. 1989. p. 418. 
  10. ^Huxley, Aldous (1930). Jesting Pilate. London: Chatto and Windus. 
  11. ^Knowles, Elizabeth M., ed. (1999). The Oxford Dictionary of Quotations. Oxford University Press. pp. 42–44. 
  12. ^Markby, Thomas (1853). The Essays, or, Counsels, Civil and Moral; With a Table of the Colours of Good and Evil. London: Parker. pp. xi–xii. Retrieved 13 May 2012. 

Essays of Francis Bacon
The Essays or Counsels, Civil and Moral, of Francis Ld. Verulam Viscount St. Albans

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Francis Bacon (1561-1626)

Of Anger

TO SEEK to extinguish anger utterly, is but a bravery of the Stoics. We have better oracles: Be angry, but sin not. Let not the sun go down upon your anger. Anger must be limited and confined, both in race and in time. We will first speak how the natural inclination and habit to be angry, may be attempted and calmed. Secondly, how the particular motions of anger may be repressed, or at least refrained from doing mischief. Thirdly, how to raise anger, or appease anger in another.

For the first; there is no other way but to meditate, and ruminate well upon the effects of anger, how it troubles man’s life. And the best time to do this, is to look back upon anger, when the fit is thoroughly over. Seneca saith well, That anger is like ruin, which breaks itself upon that it falls. The Scripture exhorteth us to possess our souls in patience. Whosoever is out of patience, is out of possession of his soul. Men must not turn bees;

... animasque in vulnere ponunt.

Anger is certainly a kind of baseness; as it appears well in the weakness of those subjects in whom it reigns; children, women, old folks, sick folks. Only men must beware, that they carry their anger rather with scorn, than with fear; so that they may seem rather to be above the injury, than below it; which is a thing easily done, if a man will give law to himself in it.

For the second point; the causes and motives of anger, are chiefly three. First, to be too sensible of hurt; for no man is angry, that feels not himself hurt; and therefore tender and delicate persons must needs be oft angry; they have so many things to trouble them, which more robust natures have little sense of. The next is, the apprehension and construction of the injury offered, to be, in the circumstances thereof, full of contempt: for contempt is that, which putteth an edge upon anger, as much or more than the hurt itself. And therefore, when men are ingenious in picking out circumstances of contempt, they do kindle their anger much. Lastly, opinion of the touch of a man’s reputation, doth multiply and sharpen anger. Wherein the remedy is, that a man should have, as Consalvo was wont to say, telam honoris crassiorem. But in all refrainings of anger, it is the best remedy to win time; and to make a man’s self believe, that the opportunity of his revenge is not yet come, but that he foresees a time for it; and so to still himself in the meantime, and reserve it.

To contain anger from mischief, though it take hold of a man, there be two things, whereof you must have special caution. The one, of extreme bitterness of words, especially if they be aculeate and proper; for cummunia maledicta are nothing so much; and again, that in anger a man reveal no secrets; for that, makes him not fit for society. The other, that you do not peremptorily break off, in any business, in a fit of anger; but howsoever you show bitterness, do not act anything, that is not revocable.

For raising and appeasing anger in another; it is done chiefly by choosing of times, when men are frowardest and worst disposed, to incense them. Again, by gathering (as was touched before) all that you can find out, to aggravate the contempt. And the two remedies are by the contraries. The former to take good times, when first to relate to a man an angry business; for the first impression is much; and the other is, to sever, as much as may be, the construction of the injury from the point of contempt; imputing it to misunderstanding, fear, passion, or what you will.

Continue...

Preface  •  Of Truth  •  Of Death  •  Of Unity  •  Of Revenge  •  Of Adversity  •  Of Simulation and Dissimulation  •  Of Parents  •  Of Marriage  •  Of Envy  •  Of Love  •  Of Great Place  •  Of Boldness  •  Of Goodness & Goodness of Nature  •  Of Nobility  •  Of Seditions  •  Of Atheism  •  Of Superstition  •  Of Travel  •  Of Empire  •  Of Counsel  •  Of Delays  •  Of Cunning  •  Of Wisdom Fo a Man’s Self  •  Of Innovations  •  Of Dispatch  •  Of Friendship  •  Of Expense  •  Of the True Greatness of Kingdoms and Estates  •  Of Regiment  •  Of Health  •  Of Suspicion  •  Of Discourse  •  Of Plantations  •  Of Riches  •  Of Prophecies  •  Of Ambition  •  Of Masques  •  Of Nature  •  Of Custom  •  Of Fortune  •  Of Usury  •  Of Beauty  •  Of Deformity  •  Of Building  •  Of Gardens  •  Of Negotiating  •  Of Followers and Friends  •  Of Suitors  •  Of Studies  •  Of Faction  •  Of Ceremonies and Respects  •  Of Praise  •  Of Vain-glory  •  Of Honor and Reputation  •  Of Judicature  •  Of Anger  •  Of Vicissitude of Things  •  Of Fame  •