Skip to content

Read Think Write Essay Rubric Writing

Contribute to ReadWriteThink / RSS / FAQs / Site Demonstrations / Contact Us / About Us

 

Find content from Thinkfinity Partners using a visual bookmarking and sharing tool.

More

 

Your students can save their work with Student Interactives.

More


Home › Results from ReadWriteThink

1-10 of 43 Results from ReadWriteThink

 

 

Sort by:

 

 

  1. Classroom Resources | Grades   3 – 5  |  Printout  |  Writing Starter
    Acrostic Poem
    Acrostic poems are fun to write. Your students will find constructing them easy, too, thanks to this helpful tool, which has endless possibilities for curriculum integration.
  2. Classroom Resources | Grades   K – 1  |  Printout  |  Graphic Organizer
    Alphabet Chart
    This alphabet chart has many possibilities for helping your students learn and review their letters, sounds, phonemes, and word formations.
  3. Classroom Resources | Grades   3 – 12  |  Printout  |  Assessment Tool
    Anticipation Guide
    Help establish a purpose for reading—and generate post-reading reflection and discussion—with this guide.
  4. Classroom Resources | Grades   K – 12  |  Printout  |  Writing Starter
    Book Review Template
    Students can use this template as a means of communicating about a book that they have read.
  5. Classroom Resources | Grades   K – 6  |  Printout  |  Graphic Organizer
    Character Map
    Who are the characters in this story? Students will examine what a character looks like, what a character does, and how other characters react to him or her.
  6. Classroom Resources | Grades   5 – 12  |  Printout  |  Informational Sheet
    Common Content Area Roots and Affixes
    This printout offers 50 or so common roots, prefixes, and affixes that give students access to hundreds of key concepts across the content areas.
  7. Classroom Resources | Grades   3 – 12  |  Printout  |  Graphic Organizer
    Compare and Contrast Chart
    This organizer can be used to help students explain similarities and differences between two things or ideas. After this organizer has been completed, it could easily be developed into a classroom discussion or writing topic on the information gathered.
  8. Classroom Resources | Grades   3 – 12  |  Printout  |  Assessment Tool
    Compare and Contrast Rubric
    Students and teachers can use this rubric when doing writing that compares and contrasts two things, as well as when assessing the writing.
  9. Classroom Resources | Grades   3 – 8  |  Printout  |  Graphic Organizer
    Concept Map
    This concept map can be used in a variety of ways to show relationships between words and phrases. Students can add arrows as needed and group certain ideas together.
  10. Classroom Resources | Grades   3 – 12  |  Printout  |  Graphic Organizer
    Conflict Map
    Ask students to remember a story with no problem or conflict. That would be difficult to do! With this printout, students learn to examine the critical plot element of conflict.

 

Grading rubrics can be of great benefit to both you and your students. For you, a rubric saves time and decreases subjectivity. Specific criteria are explicitly stated, facilitating the grading process and increasing your objectivity. For students, the use of grading rubrics helps them to meet or exceed expectations, to view the grading process as being “fair,” and to set goals for future learning.

In order to help your students meet or exceed expectations of the assignment, be sure to discuss the rubric with your students when you assign an essay. It is helpful to show them examples of written pieces that meet and do not meet the expectations. As an added benefit, because the criteria are explicitly stated, the use of the rubric decreases the likelihood that students will argue about the grade they receive. The explicitness of the expectations helps students know exactly why they lost points on the assignment and aids them in setting goals for future improvement.

  • Routinely have students score peers’ essays using the rubric as the assessment tool. This increases their level of awareness of the traits that distinguish successful essays from those that fail to meet the criteria. Have peer editors use the Reviewer’s Comments section to add any praise, constructive criticism, or questions.
  • Alter some expectations or add additional traits on the rubric as needed. Students’ needs may necessitate making more rigorous criteria for advanced learners or less stringent guidelines for younger or special needs students. Furthermore, the content area for which the essay is written may require some alterations to the rubric. In social studies, for example, an essay about geographical landforms and their effect on the culture of a region might necessitate additional criteria about the use of specific terminology.
  • After you and your students have used the rubric, have them work in groups to make suggested alterations to the rubric to more precisely match their needs or the parameters of a particular writing assignment.