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Imtiaz Dharker Blessing Essay Help

The skin cracks like a pod.
There never is enough water.

Imagine the drip of it,
the small splash, echo
in a tin mug,
the voice of a kindly god.

Sometimes, the sudden rush
of fortune. The municipal pipe bursts,
silver crashes to the ground
and the flow has found
a roar of tongues. From the huts,
a congregation : every man woman
child for streets around
butts in, with pots,
brass, copper, aluminium,
plastic buckets,
frantic hands,

and naked children
screaming in the liquid sun,
their highlights polished to perfection,
flashing light,
as the blessing sings
over their small bones.

I think this is the second poem by Imtiaz Dharker that I have posted on this blog. I just think she is an extremely exciting poet; she uses such bright, colourful language.

I love the opening of this poem, with its image of skin that “cracks like a pod”. This phrase delivers a strong image of dehydration, of drought, and of cracked earth in the heat. The cracked “pod” brings to my mind a pod of seeds, scorched by the sun so that it will never produce or grow or bear fruit…”There is never enough water.” The simplicity of this second statement to me amplifies the tragic ramifications of its significance. Nothing can grow — nothing can live — where there is no water.

In the second stanza, as the poet invites us to “imagine the drip of it”, I find that the sound of the words here are so cleverly evocative that they even make me thirsty! The sibilance of the “small splash”, and the pleasing clanging of consanants in “echoing”, “tin” and “mug” deliver such a strong image of water that is so needed after the image of the “crack[ed].. pod”… It is significant that the poet describes this sound of water as the “voice of a kindly god” because it emphasises to us that very often the people in such a situation (where water is so scarce), view the advent of such a commodity as a kindly act of god. What else is there to do when you have no possibility to improve your situation? What else is there to believe when you have no possibility of educating yourself? I imagine this poem to be set in India somewhere, because of Dharker’s background.

There is a “sudden rush of fortune” in the third stanza, when the municipal pipe bursts. I think this is very clever, the way the poet draws a parallel between financial wealth and the water. Notice that the water is “silver” — so much more bright and expensive than the “brass, copper, aluminium,/ plastic buckets,/ frantic hands” that scramble to trap just a bit of the precious liquid. I think the fact that the water comes from a “municipal pipe” is important. To me, this evokes the idea of a mistake on the part of the authorities — the pipe burst and so the water got out. When I read this poem it makes me think of corrupt authorities that could help their people, but don’t. And when the pipe bursts, the reaction is a furious scramble to get as much from the happy accident as possible.  The people in the poem are described as a “congregation” here; again we have some ambiguous religious language that (to me) enforces the notion of superstitious, uneducated people, who do not know how wronged they are by the authorities.

For a moment, in the final stanza, the people — “the naked children” — become perfect, even godlike, as everything around them seems to turn to water. They stand in the “liquid sun” and are turned to gold, “polished to perfection”; they are rich as they stand in the world that has come alive thanks to the water. I think this is such a clever, and beautiful image because it really brings home to us the significance of water — how absolutely indispensable a commodity it is — and how a “rush” of water can be a miracle and a gift from god for those who are not fortunate enough to have been born in a country where it is taken for granted.

The final line, “the blessing sings over their small bones” is so very beautiful. I love the use of “sings”, and the “small bones”, and think it just reinforces the idea of the children’s mortality, reminding us that without water, they would certainly die.

Reviewed by Emily Ardagh

blessingcorruptiondroughtimtiaz dharkerpoempoetPoetrystarvationwater

The Meaning Of Water In The Poem Blessing By Imtiaz Dharker

To start with, the theme of the poem is that water is a necessity to life and is a precious gift. This gift is known as a “Blessing”. To begin with, there is a lack of water in which the poem takes place. Imtiaz starts the poem off strong stating right away how “The skin cracks like a pod” (1). Human skin becomes dry and cracked when it is not moisturized. A pod is useless when it is dries up and becomes fragile because of the deficiency of water. The pod links to human skin because water keeps the skin hydrated and helps the body function. In addition, the villagers in the poem value water. When the municipal pipes explode, “silver crashes to the ground” (9). To the villagers, the water shines like silver. The villagers worship the water as if it will make them rich. In conclusion, water is a necessity to life and people in countries with extreme heat acknowledge the gift of water.Also, there are a series of poetic devices that are used throughout the duration of the poem that have outstanding purposes. The three significant devices used are metaphors, imagery, and onomatopoeias. First of all, metaphors have an excellent purpose in “Blessing”. As the water drips in the tin mug it sounds like, “the voice of a kindly god” (6). The water resembles the voice of god to show how much the villagers honour the water. The reader is able paint a clear picture and this makes the poem easier to understand. Furthermore, imagery is widely used in the poem and has a great role. The drips of water in the tin mug sounds like “…a kindly god” (6) ands the pipes burst and “a congregation”(12) appears. The children play in the water and “the blessing sings”(22). The type of imagery is different than usual because the poet uses religious terms to convey imagery. The reader is able to imagine what is going on. By referring by to religious terms, the villagers appear holy and this creates a vivid image that when the water bursts, it was an act from god and did not happen by accident. Finally, onomatopoeias have a marvellous use in the poem. Imtiaz starts off the second stanza stating, “Sometimes, the sudden rush/ of fortune…crashes to the ground” (7-9). By adding in onomatopoeias, the reader is able to hear the sound of the water as it rushes and crashes. Therefore, the poetic devices that Imtiaz uses have a tremendous purpose throughout the poem.
Last of all, “Blessing” by Imtiaz Dharker represents the period of the poem written in nineteen eighty-nine, which is post-modern. First and foremost, temperatures were sweltering. In fact, the hottest day was on April seventh with a high temperature of forty degrees Celsius (WeatherSpark Beta). This connects to the poem because it deals with a hot country where dehydration is quite normal. Since the poem takes place in the slums in Mumbai, India, “There is never enough water” (2) for the villagers to consume and the great degree of heat causes more problems to their health. Adding to that, the humidity was high. June...

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